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International China Pulls Ahead of US in Quantum Computing Race

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by Orgasmo, Jul 16, 2021.

  1. 12ga. Gold Belt

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    Dude they can't even a make a decent dirt bike. I had to buy a $11,000 husky. Two wheels and a motor. How complicated is that? Can't even make a decent competitor. Believe me I've tried for years since western and japanese bikes are though the roof and I burn one up every couple years. I ate a 450F china bike in a weekend. (bent handlebars, broken frame, smoking motor, wobbly wheels, etc was trashed in about 10 hours of hard riding) One weekend in glamis didnt come back $4000 down the tubes. I've raced motorcycles for 45 years and never seen such junk. Even the 80s KTMs were better lol.

    Still waiting on china cars. Who likes paying 40k for a sedan? No one.

    Seems best they can do is toys for my dog. Hope he doesnt die.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2021
  2. PEDS Help me Post Silver Belt

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    lmao
     
  3. MicroBrew Titanium Belt

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    Everything you just mentioned was invented in the West; or Japan or SK. China mostly just copies and steals, and occassionally makes a little advancement. Their high speed trains are German, Japanese and French tech, either bought as part of technology transfer or just stolen.

    The only countries who buy Chinese weapon systems are those that are either not allowed access to Western tech or can't afford it. How do you figure they are at the forefront of drone tech?
     
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  4. M3t4tr0n Sherriff of Sherfront

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    Reptilians?
     
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  5. Deorum ~ MTr/mm² ~

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    A lot being said in this thread about Chinese industry, ingenuity, and innovation (or lackthereof). There is something to a lot of those comments but in no way should that mean America can just take it easy and rest on its laurels. The CCP certainly has the structure, determination and funding to pull off incredible discoveries and technological advancenents but there is an existing drawback and it isn't insignificant.

    It's almost become kind of cliche but modern Chinese really aren't nurtured to think in the abstract scientifically, it's predominantly all rote learning. In fact, their rigid social/political system and 'homogeneous' Han dream actively works to inhibit that, even more so now with the renewed totalitarian cult of personality imprint. In other words, diversity is a literal strength for the US and its future outlook.

    This isn't an anti-China bill so much as it is pro-America legislation, so it was pretty presumptuous on their part but the fact their state media is so up in arms is a humorously great thing. It's actually a little north of $250 billion with an enormous injection of funding to both fundamental and applied scientific laboratory research, in addition to bolstering incentives for stateside microchip manufacturing.



    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-56316943.amp

    8 March 2021

    China is at least 30 years away from becoming a manufacturing nation of "great power", a government advisor told party delegates on Sunday.

    Many observers already see China as the "world's factory" given that more than a third of global output from cars to phones comes from there. But China's leaders are concerned about its heavy dependence on the US for high-tech products like semiconductors.

    "Basic capabilities are still weak" Miao Wei warned on Sunday. "Core technologies are in the hands of others" and China runs the risk of "being hit in the throat" warned Mr. Miao, who was Minister of Industry and Information Technology for a decade.


     
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  6. Whippy McGee Meme Master

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    What does it matter if we are ahead or not? Once we figure it out, we will have some crooked politician like the Clintons or Biden just give it to the Chinese. See nuclear submarine and missile targeting technology as an example.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2021
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  7. tramendous Silver Belt

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  8. Deorum ~ MTr/mm² ~

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    TSMC is a dynamite corporation and obviously the premier contract manufacturer in the world. However, it doesn't design or engineer microchips itself; and it cannot advance process technology without a select handful of capital equipment and machinery suppliers, namely Applied Materials (US), ASML (Netherlands), KLA-Tencor (US), Lam Research (US) and Tokyo Electron (Japan). They hold the industry's proverbial 'keys to the kingdom'. It isn't surprising to see TSMC offshoring assets and capital expenditures to America though, in light of the CCP's increasing hostile demeanor towards Taiwan. This is just the tip of the iceberg.

    Taiwan Semiconductor’s Phoenix plant likely three times larger than originally announced

    Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. Ltd.’s planned Phoenix, Arizona manufacturing plant will likely be three times larger than was originally announced.

    The cost to build the manufacturing facility is likely to be closer to $35 billion, nearly triple the $12 billion first announced, according to sources with knowledge of the deal and Asian media reports. Other media reports describe the Arizona plant as a "mega-site" that would include six factories.

    City of Phoenix documents suggest that the project will be built in multiple phases, with the first phase totaling about 3.8 million square feet of semiconductor manufacturing facilities as well as administrative and other support facilities. TSMC bought 1,128 acres in North Phoenix in December for the plant.

    The land TSMC bought at a state land auction was part of a larger piece of state-owned property that the city of Phoenix had rezoned for employment purposes. At the time TSMC bought its land, city officials said the surrounding area would likely attract companies with a similar mission wanting to work alongside TSMC.

    Construction on TSMC's facility is expected to break ground this year and be operational by 2024.
     
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  9. Mr Holmes You talking money, need a hearing aid

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    This is what I've been saying for a while. We haven't really seen any break thru innovations come out of China. Which probably is a big part of why they feel the need to steal other country's IP.
     
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  10. CaptHANDSUP Green Belt

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    If there is a revolution and a democracy is installed, i think the secessionist groups should also be given independence. Xinjiang, guangdong, and tibet.

    They should all be independent democracies like Taiwan. This will make the region a lot more peaceful as there isnt the constant threat of a massive empire.

    It wont matter much either way as long as western countries (eu +/- russia, north america, australia+nz) and coastal east asia (Taiwan, South Korea, and Japan) stay politically aligned. Something that is highly likely.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2021
  11. Deorum ~ MTr/mm² ~

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    They're finding the 'barrier to entry' of cutting edge R&D more difficult than anybody imagined. I already knew the CCP wouldn't be able to crack microchips and I'm sure it came off incredibly arrogant a few years ago, but it was correct. A fundamental problem for China is that knockoffs, shortcuts and the need for instant gratification with equal benefit is endemic in their culture.
     
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  12. Deorum ~ MTr/mm² ~

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    If for no other reason: Because Richard Feynman was an original pioneer of it, and he was one of the most Americans to ever Murican. A fucking real one of true integrity, and it would be a disgrace to his towering legacy for the US to be usurped.

    Richard Phillips Feynman (May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics for which he proposed the parton model. For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger and Shin'ichirō Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965.

    Feynman developed a widely used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams. During his lifetime, Feynman became one of the best-known scientists in the world. In a 1999 poll of 130 leading physicists worldwide by the British journal Physics World, he was ranked as one of the ten greatest physicists of all time.

    He assisted in the development of the atomic bomb during World War II and became known to a wide public in the 1980s as a member of the Rogers Commission, the panel that investigated the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. Along with his work in theoretical physics, Feynman has been credited with pioneering the field of quantum computing and introducing the concept of nanotechnology. He held the Richard C. Tolman professorship in theoretical physics at the California Institute of Technology.

    Feynman was a keen popularizer of physics through both books and lectures, including a 1959 talk on top-down nanotechnology called There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom, and the three-volume publication of his undergraduate lectures, The Feynman Lectures on Physics. Feynman also became known through his semi-autobiographical books Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! and What Do You Care What Other People Think?.

    [​IMG]

     
  13. Yehudim Brown Belt

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    Without some changes in their system, IMO, China is going to hit a long decline.

    With the constant cracking down on business, at some point they’re going to scare away foreign investors, right?

    If they don’t change, I predict that they will go back to the same old cycle Russia has followed for hundreds of years now going back to Peter the Great and ending with Stalin: borrowing Western technology to compete with the West but not making any changes to governance, leading to a long decline.

    China has a way out of that cycle thanks to the capitalist market system and foreign investment but at what point does that cease to exist when you scare away foreigners and large state owned companies make up greater and greater market share over private companies?
     
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  14. Deorum ~ MTr/mm² ~

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    To further illustrate the point: Intel recently declared they would regain industry leadership on process node technology by 2025. And they will, partially because they have aggressive and competent leadership with a deep level engineering experience for the first time in over a decade but mostly because they're first in line for ASML's next generation High-NA EUV lithography machinery. There isn't a damn thing TSMC or Samsung (much less China lmao) can do to offset this, Intel will regain advanced manufacturing leadership.

    At same time on their new foundry services front, they've locked up deals to produce chips for both Amazon and Qualcomm based on the promise of that cutting edge technology. This is all in conjunction with the $20 billion capital investment they threw down earlier this year, the $30 billion acquisition of Global Foundries and plans to build a separate US based mega-fab with an announcement coming before the end of the year. TSMC and Samsung themselves have also thrown down a combined $50+ billion into US semiconductor manufacturing this year so it almost doesn't even matter.

    I honestly don't care if they choose AZ or not because the most cutting edge factory Samsung plans on constructing to produce their DRAM chips will be made in America regardless. These developments also underscore the importance of geopolitical alliances the US has with East Asia. The amount of capital being thrown down right down is fucking jaw dropping, and not even taking into consideration the $250+ billion Competition & Innovation Act moving through Congress. The CCP has triggered a WOKE of a wildly different variety.

    In other news:

    Quantum Computing: Intel's cryogenic chip shows it can control qubits even in a deep freeze

    Intel's quantum computing efforts are starting to show tangible results: two years after the company first unveiled its Horse Ridge cryogenic control chip, researchers have demonstrated that the technology is delivering on its original promise, and paving the way for quantum computers to become more practical.

    They published a paper on it in the world's leading scientific journal.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03469-4

    The most promising quantum algorithms require quantum processors that host millions of quantum bits when targeting practical applications. A key challenge towards large-scale quantum computation is the interconnect complexity. In current solid-state qubit implementations, an important interconnect bottleneck appears between the quantum chip in a dilution refrigerator and the room-temperature electronics.

    Advanced lithography supports the fabrication of both control electronics and qubits in silicon using technology compatible with complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). When the electronics are designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures, they can ultimately be integrated with the qubits on the same die or package, overcoming the ‘wiring bottleneck'.

    Here we report a cryogenic CMOS control chip operating at 3 kelvin, which outputs tailored microwave bursts to drive silicon quantum bits cooled to 20 millikelvin. We first benchmark the control chip and find an electrical performance consistent with qubit operations of 99.99 percent fidelity, assuming ideal qubits. Next, we use it to coherently control actual qubits encoded in the spin of single electrons confined in silicon quantum dots and find that the cryogenic control chip achieves the same fidelity as commercial instruments at room temperature.

    Furthermore, we demonstrate the capabilities of the control chip by programming a number of benchmarking protocols, as well as the Deutsch–Josza algorithm, on a two-qubit quantum processor. These results open up the way towards a fully integrated, scalable silicon-based quantum computer.


    "China is peculiar herd-like nation. The citizens are often more like automatons than people, even the children are spiritless and look obtuse. It would be a pity if these Chinese supplant all other races. For the likes of us the mere thought is unspeakably dreary." ~ @TheGreatA

    No, that was actually Albert Einstein.

    <{Heymansnicker}>

    And he cannot be canceled, because even if you brushed aside the fact that he derived mass/energy equivalence, proved the existence of atoms beyond doubt to confirm a hypothesis that was originally put forth in 5th Century BC Ancient Greece, and identified the force carrier of electromagnetism without knowledge of which the transistor, integrated circuits and industrial tech as a whole couldn't of come into existence...

    He still flipped human understanding of time and space on its head with General Relativity and essentially laid the foundation for the whole of contemporary astrophysics and cosmology. The technological instruments needed to investigate the more radical implications and predictions that arose from the Einstein Field Equations are finally being made available. The way the last five years have gone, it wouldn't be a shock if we discovered traversible wormholes or developed an Alcubierre warp drive.

    In short, I don't believe China is going to do that.

    <36>
     
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  15. ElKarlo Titanium Belt

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    Wow, and yes Samsung coming to the USA would be big in so many other ways.
    Btw a scalable quantum computer? Sounds like actual fiction but will have some amazing results down the road like cracking the human genome did in the late 90s on medical research
     
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  16. PrinceOfPain Gold Belt

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    The modern Chinese impression of that period in China's history is very similar to Einstein's. They are apparently more capable of honest self-reflection than are Westerners. And their defense of that Einstein quote, while Westerners were getting their panties in a bunch and talking about boycotting the man's memory, indicates a part of the problem.
    Yesterday's glories are just that: yesterday's.

    Also, there are few people worse to seek ethnic opinions from than German Jews. Al' also thought the Japanese were intellectually inferior - though, he did have a more positive general impression of their culture.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2021
  17. MicroBrew Titanium Belt

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    It's not just the Dem admin, it's been every administration since Nixon / Kissinger cosied up to Mao Zedong.
     
  18. Deorum ~ MTr/mm² ~

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    The Search For Dark Matter Gets Boost from Quantum Technology

    Researchers around the world have built dozens of detectors in hopes of discovering dark matter. As a graduate student, I helped design and operate one of these detectors, aptly named HAYSTAC. But despite decades of experimental effort, scientists have yet to identify the dark matter particle.

    Now, the search for dark matter has received an unlikely assist from technology used in quantum computing research. In a new paper published in the journal Nature, my colleagues on the HAYSTAC team and I describe how we used a bit of quantum trickery to double the rate at which our detector can search for dark matter. Our result adds a much-needed speed boost to the hunt for this mysterious particle.


    Let's Go.

    The Alcubierre drive, Alcubierre warp drive, or Alcubierre metric (referring to metric tensor) is a speculative warp drive idea based on a solution of Einstein's Field Equations in General Relativity as proposed by theoretical physicist Miguel Alcubierre, by which a spacecraft could achieve apparent faster-than-light travel if a configurable energy-density field lower than that of vacuum (that is, negative mass) could be created.[1][2][3]

    Rather than exceeding the speed of light within a local reference frame, a spacecraft would traverse distances by contracting space in front of it and expanding space behind it, resulting in effective faster-than-light travel. Objects cannot accelerate to the speed of light within normal spacetime; instead, the Alcubierre drive shifts space around an object so that the object would arrive at its destination more quickly than light would in normal space without breaking any physical laws.

    Although the metric proposed by Alcubierre is consistent with the Einstein field equations, construction of such a drive is not necessarily possible. The proposed mechanism of the Alcubierre drive implies a negative energy density and therefore requires exotic matter or manipulation of dark energy. However, following an argument developed by physicists analyzing traversable Einstein-Rosen bridges (wormholes), Alcubierre argued that the Casimir vacuum between parallel plates could fulfill the negative-energy requirement for the Alcubierre drive.[4][5][6][7]
     
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  19. Deorum ~ MTr/mm² ~

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    I agree, which is exactly why I said it isn't good enough to rest on laurels before diving into how things are being driven forward. At the same time, former glories laid the foundation of the present. They provided invaluable first-mover advantages (capital goods, firms, institutions, infrastructure, markets, resources), all of which persist and are tapped into today. As far as Einstein goes, it's difficult to memorialize someone who never really died; or at least remains as relevant as he ever was as a living person.
     
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  20. Deorum ~ MTr/mm² ~

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    This is good shit @superking, and worth it even if you run in background. He has been pretty much everything hoped for when he returned to Intel at the beginning of the year.



    [​IMG]

    CC: @ElKarlo
     
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