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Social Droughts and Water Wars: The Never-Ending California Saga.

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by Arkain2K, Jul 14, 2017.

  1. Yehudim Brown Belt

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    Arizona is building some new semiconductor factories and it was a head scratcher as to why they would do it there and apparently TSMC will deal with the water issue via recycling billions of gallons of water.
     
  2. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    California regulators vote to restrict water access for thousands of farmers amid severe drought
    By Ray Sanchez, Alexandra Meeks and Brisa Colón | August 04, 2021


    California water regulators voted Tuesday to restrict water access for thousands of Central Valley farmers as the state endures a severe drought.

    The California State Water Board unanimously agreed to issue an emergency order that bans some farmers from diverting water from rivers and streams in the Sacramento and San Joaquin river watersheds to irrigate their crops.

    Amid one of California's worst droughts, the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta watershed has been suffering from low supply as demand continues to climb.

    "This drought is very real," said Karen Ross, secretary of California's Department of Food and Agriculture. "It is a painful moment."

    Under the new order, Californians who plan to divert more than 55 gallons per day from rivers or streams in this region must submit a petition and proposal to the state's deputy director for approval. All water rights holders must also report their water use and submit a certification to comply with the new standards.

    Any person, business or group that violates the order will be subject to possible penalties and fines, officials said. The water board said enforcement will be incremental and focused mainly on high-grade water violations that significantly impact water flow.

    The order must be approved by the Office of Administrative Law and filed with the Secretary of State before it becomes effective, according to a news release from the state water board. The regulations are expected to go into effect August 16, officials said.

    The Delta is the state's largest surface water source, supplying two-thirds of Californians with at least some portion of their drinking water, according to regulators. Officials said the state is going through what is expected to be the second driest two-year period on record. April, May and June were the warmest and driest on record since 1896, they said.

    During a comment period, residents acknowledged the crisis in the state, but some said the action violated due process rights and urged regulators to slow down implementation of the order. Some speakers said the order placed an unfair burden on mostly smaller farmers who would be left to prove their rights to water.

    The drought has worsened significantly in California after months of record heat and little precipitation. In the most critically parched regions, wildfires are burning at incredible pace.

    More than 95% of the West is in some level of drought, with nearly two-thirds in extreme or exceptional drought -- the two worst categories. Six states are entirely in drought conditions.

    https://www.cnn.com/2021/08/04/us/california-central-valley-farmers-water-access/index.html
     
  3. llperez22 Silver Belt

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    agriculture uses 4x as much water in the state of california as all urban use combined. Curbing water consumption by your every day person is a small drop in the bucket. They already have lots of infrastructure throughout the state to use reclaimed water (treated sewage) for agriculture purposes but people dont shower or flush toilets nearly fast enough to supply farming. California economy benefits heavily on produce so the powers that be need to keep the focus on joe blow tearing out his lawn so they can buy time before the highly profitable agriculture business starts leaving the state
     
  4. badascan Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    Maybe 20 years ago I thought it would be a smart play to invest in desalination plants... The technology wasn't cost efficient but someone has to be working on better ways of doing it.

    Living in a desert and expecting to have enough water is myopic so their option is to take from others or use the ocean water if they want to stay in a desert... Stealing water is easiest for those without ethics but there sure is a lot of water in the ocean, plus a salt byproduct can be exported...
     
  5. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    California drought threatens almond production
    By: Associated Press | Aug 17, 2021​


    A deepening drought threatens California’s $6 billion almond industry, which produces about 80% of the world’s almonds.

    As water becomes scarce and expensive, some growers have stopped irrigating their orchards and plan to tear them out years earlier than planned.

    After decades of expansion in California's agricultural Central Valley, almond production is expected to decline.

    That could lead to higher prices for consumers who have embraced the popular nut.

    As the drought drains reservoirs and forces restrictions on water use, critics say the thirsty crop isn’t sustainable at current levels in California.

    The state is becoming hotter and drier because of climate change.

    https://www.turnto23.com/news/state/california-drought-threatens-almond-production?_amp=true
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2021
  6. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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  7. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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  8. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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  9. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    SoCal’s biggest water supplier calls for reduced usage amid drought, 1st-ever Colorado River shortage
    By Associated Press, KTLA Digital Staff, Ellina Abovian, and Wendy Burch​


    As widespread drought conditions continue to stress water supplies, the board of Southern California’s biggest water supplier issued a water supply alert Tuesday, calling on people across the region to voluntarily cut back their use.

    The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California’s action asks water agencies in the region to move toward voluntarily reducing water demand and create a unified conservation message for some 19 million customers across six counties.

    The action is intended to prevent the need for more severe restrictions for the district’s 26 member water agencies. It’s the MWD’s first official supply alert in seven years, the Los Angeles Times reported.

    “It’s our responsibility to ensure our residents and businesses always have safe and reliable water, no matter what’s what we’re facing, including these historic drought conditions,” said Adel Hagekhalil, MWD’s general manager.

    He suggested shorter showers, watering lawns only one or two days a week, converting to a drought-tolerant landscape and getting plumbing leaks repaired.

    https://ktla.com/news/local-news/so...mid-drought-1st-ever-colorado-river-shortage/
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2021
  10. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    Drought worsens in Southern California, with Ventura County in worst category
    BY MELISSA HERNANDEZ | AUG. 23, 2021

    [​IMG]
    A map of California, showcasing the areas affected by drought conditions as of Aug. 17.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/...lifornia-now-in-exceptional-drought?_amp=true
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2021
  11. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

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    Years later, California voters still wait on water projects
    By ADAM BEAM

    [​IMG]

    In 2014, in the middle of a severe drought that would test California’s complex water storage system like never before, voters told the state to borrow $7.5 billion and use part of it to build projects to stockpile more water.

    Seven years later, that drought has come and gone, replaced by an even hotter and drier one that is draining the state’s reservoirs at an alarming rate. But none of the more than half-dozen water storage projects scheduled to receive that money have been built.

    The largest project by far is a proposed lake in Northern California, which would be the state’s first new reservoir of significant size in more than 40 years. People have talked about building the Sites Reservoir since the 1950s. But the cost, plus shifting political priorities, stopped it from happening.

    Now, a major drought gripping the western United States has put the project back in the spotlight. It’s slated to get $836 million in taxpayer money to help cover it’s $3.9 billion price tag if project officials can meet a deadline by year’s end. The Biden administration recently committed $80 million to the reservoir, the largest appropriation of any water storage scheduled to receive funding next year.

    And the project could get some of the $1.15 billion included in an infrastructure bill that has passed the U.S. Senate.

    Still, the delay has frustrated some lawmakers, who view it as a wasted opportunity now that the state is preparing to cut of water to thousands of farmers in the Central Valley because of a shortage.

    “The longer you don’t build, the more expensive it gets,” said Republican state Sen. Brian Dahle, whose rural Northern California district includes farmers.

    Storage was once the centerpiece of California’s water management strategy, highlighted by a building bonanza in the mid-20th century of a number of dams and reservoirs. But in the more than 40 years since California last opened a major new reservoir, the politics and policy have shifted toward a more environmental focus that has caused tension between urban and rural legislators and the communities they represent.

    The voter-approved bond in 2014 was supposed to jump-start a number of long-delayed storage projects. But some experts say the delays aren’t surprising, given the complexities and environmental hazards that come with building new water projects.

    “We have about 1,500 reservoirs in California. If you assume people are smart — which they kind of are most of the time — they will have built reservoirs at the 1,500 best reservoir sites already,” said Jay Lund, co-director of the Center for Watershed Sciences at the University of California-Davis. “What you have left over is more expensive sites that give you less water.”

    California’s Mediterranean climate means it gets most of its rain and snow in the winter and spring, followed by hot, dry summers and falls that see rivers and streams dry up. The largest of California’s reservoirs are operated by the state and federal governments, although neither has built a new one since the 1979 New Melones Lake near Sonora, about 50 miles (80 kilometers) northwest of Yosemite National Park.

    That could change with the Sites Reservoir project, which would flood what’s left of the town of Sites, located in a valley amid California’s coast range mountains.

    The town’s roots go back to the 1850s, when John Sites, a German immigrant, settled there. At its peak in the late 1800s and early 1900s, it was known for a sandstone quarry that provided building materials throughout the state, including the iconic Ferry Building in San Francisco.

    But when the quarry closed shortly after World War I, the town slowly dwindled. Fire destroyed many of the buildings, leaving behind about 10 houses on unirrigated land that can only be used for agriculture during the rainy season. Officials would have to eventually buy those properties from residents to build the reservoir. With only two ways in and out of the valley, it’s an ideal spot to flood and turn into a massive lake to store water.

    But unlike most California reservoirs, Sites would not be connected to a river or stream. Instead, operators would have to pump water from the Sacramento River whenever it has extra to give. The idea is to take advantage of wet years like 2018, when California got so much rain and snow in the Sierra Nevada mountains that reservoirs were filled beyond capacity.

    “We’re really redefining how water is developed in California,” said Jerry Brown, executive director of the Sites Project Authority, who has no relation to the former governor of the same name.

    Pumping the water is expensive, which, along with concern from environmental groups, is one reason the reservoir has been talked about for more than 60 years but never built. Many environmental groups argue the reservoir would do more harm than good because they say operators would have to pull way more water than is environmentally safe from the Sacramento River to make the project feasible.

    “Fundamentally, it is a deadbeat dam, a pretty marginal project, or else it would have been built years ago,” said Ron Stork, a senior policy advocate for Friends of the River, an environmental advocacy group.

    Gov. Gavin Newsom’s administration, which included the Sites Reservoir in its water plan, sees the reservoir as a way to prepare for a future impacted by climate change. California’s reservoir system is designed to capture water from melted snow in the mountains. But climate change could mean less snow and more rain, which the state is not as equipped to capture.

    “We are going to start swinging to more extremes, (a) dry, deep drought or big flood,” said Karla Nemeth, director of the California Department of Water Resources. “I do think there is some value to those kinds of projects.”

    It will cost $3.9 billion to build the Sites Reservoir, and that’s after project leaders made it smaller to shave about $1 billion off the price tag. Most of the money will come from customers who will buy the water, the federal government and bank loans. California taxpayers have pledged about $836 million to the project from a bond voters approved in 2014.

    But to use that money, project leaders have to meet a deadline by the end of the year to show the idea is feasible.

    “I’m absolutely confident,” Brown said. “It’s going to be close, but it’s going to make it.”

    https://apnews.com/article/business...hts-science--74bbbd535f6519b8aa79d57737e6eef4
     
  12. Yehudim Brown Belt

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    Raise the price of water and start recycling water already you bums
     

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